Eddie Filer Kills Animals, Too

Dave's Wild Life

“It's very sad that humans can't respect the lives of other species. I'm a vegan, and I think that other animals have just as much right to live as I do.” – Eddie Filer

Ignorance is indeed bliss, Eddie. But here’s the cold, hard truth: we all have some role in the killing of animals whether you eat meat or are a vegetarian or a vegan.

Prior to becoming a hunter I at least understood where meat comes from. The farmer raises the cow. The cow goes to the feed lot. The cow is fattened up in the feed lot. The cow is killed. The cow is rendered into family sized portions. The cow becomes cellophane wrapped food in the supermarket. We purchase that food and toss it on the grill. When we enjoy that delicious steak we are indirectly responsible for the death of that cow. We just paid someone else to do the dirty work.

I think that at least once in everyone’s life they should be required to kill, gut, skin, and prepare their own dinner. That would lead to a better understanding of taking an animal’s life for sustenance. We live in a troubling world where so many are detached from reality.

Vegans, like Eddie, assume since they do not personally consume meat, eggs, or dairy products that they do not harm animals. Wrong. When fields are plowed for Eddie’s vegan diet he is killing by association. Every year millions of small animals (rabbits, mice, box turtles, etc.) are squashed or chopped to bits by farm machinery. I visited some websites and learned many vegetarians have never thought about this fact until someone pointed it out to them. So, like it or not, Eddie, there is blood all over your salad.

Likewise, every time we build a road, a house, or a shopping mall something is going to die or get displaced. That makes us all, regardless of diet, responsible.

And how many snakes get killed in our local fields and groves because workers are terrified of even the harmless varieties? Eat a tomato or an orange; you’ve probably helped kill a snake that ate the pests who eat our food.

Most of us humans are omnivores. Like bears, primates, rodents, and a host of other species, we are part time predators and eat a little bit of everything. In reality, very few animals are 100% vegetarian. Some so called herbivores like duiker antelope and muntjac deer will even kill and eat ground nesting birds. Total vegetarianism is actually pretty unnatural unless you’re a deer or a zebra.

If you’re a vegetarian or a vegan because you think it’s a healthy lifestyle, that’s fine. But I have no patience for those who say they choose their diet because it doesn’t harm or kill animals. You’re fooling yourself but not the rest of us.

So what’s the point? We all make choices in our lives but once you make that choice be honest and accountable about it.

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Comments » 10

cabagepalm writes:

Like the plant had no right to live out it's life?

Beco (Inactive) writes:

David, You show that perhaps the animal rights argument for vegetarianism and veganism isn't convincing enough. But there are other arguments that are more convincing (e.g., a plant-based diet requires less fossil fuel, since industrial meat production uses enormous fossil fuel inputs). Now, if meat eaters reared and/or hunted their own meat, that would be sustainable from an environmental perspective. Anyway, I'm glad to see you trying to get people to reconnect with a reality that capitalism has encouraged us to forget about.

canyon123 writes:

I am a vegetarian. I choose to do so because of respect for animals. I understand that I have to make some sort of impact on the world around me. However, I choose to lessen that impact. Yes mice died in the process of raising wheat etc. However, my food did not sit tightly packed in a crate unable to turn around or move for the majority of its life. My food had not been bred so it no longer had the ability to stand. Sadly, I cannot support conditions in which my food is grown and I do not want to risk diseases such as E. coli that have resulted from the improper care and slaughter of meat. I also agree with Beco in reducing my carbon footprint by not consuming meat. I also utilize much less freshwater (which would have been given in tremendous quantities to the cattle). I do not make fun of your reasons for consuming meat so do not make fun of mine for choosing not too. I will probably live longer than you and will know that I did what was in my power to do to make the world a little better.

Keats writes:

in response to canyon123:

I am a vegetarian. I choose to do so because of respect for animals. I understand that I have to make some sort of impact on the world around me. However, I choose to lessen that impact. Yes mice died in the process of raising wheat etc. However, my food did not sit tightly packed in a crate unable to turn around or move for the majority of its life. My food had not been bred so it no longer had the ability to stand. Sadly, I cannot support conditions in which my food is grown and I do not want to risk diseases such as E. coli that have resulted from the improper care and slaughter of meat. I also agree with Beco in reducing my carbon footprint by not consuming meat. I also utilize much less freshwater (which would have been given in tremendous quantities to the cattle). I do not make fun of your reasons for consuming meat so do not make fun of mine for choosing not too. I will probably live longer than you and will know that I did what was in my power to do to make the world a little better.

Excellent post. The truth is that Tetzlaff would probably still be smacking tigers to get them to jump through hoops if it weren't for the change in public perceptions of animal shows. So for him to chastise Eddie Filer for hypocrisy is hypocrisy itself.

eddiefiler writes:

David:

I don't think you quite understand how I think about eating animals. For the past 30 years I've done a lot of reading about how animals are raised on the modern corporate farms, and how they are are abused on farms, stock yards and slaughter houses. It is not a pretty picture. I can't begin to tell you the amount of suffering that these millions of poor creatures have to endure just so that the meat industry can make huge profits off the suffering of animals and the gullibility of the human animal. Humans think that just because they are at the top of the food chain, they have the right to do anything they want to animals that are lesser than they are. I've read some horror stories about how animals are treated. One of the reasons I can't eat meat is because I think about the terrible suffering that the flesh had to endure at the hands of those who couldn't care less about animal suffering.

I've also read a lot about health, and more and more health authorities are coming to the conclusion that a meatless diet is much healthier. A vegan has a much greater chance of not developing cancers of the digestive tract that are killing lots of people every year.

As far as small animals being killed while fields are being tilled before planting crops, I abhor that also, but no matter what humans do, they can't be completely blameless from causing some kind of harm to other life forms and the environment. Our primitive ancestors caused much less harm to the Earth than modern man does. Primitive man didn't build roads, drive automobiles, ride in airplanes, have large corporate farms. They lived with nature and were a part of nature. Yes, they ate meat, but they didn't raise other animals on corporate farms or in boxes like calves are for veal or pregnant pigs raised in small crates where they can't turn around. Our modern farms create an enormous amount of wastes that pollute our water, and ravage the land. Cattle in the west have destroyed thousands of acres of native grasses.

Yes, I agree that I am responsible for some loss of life if I eat produce from the grocery store. In the past I've always tried to grow as much of my own food as possible in my home garden. I have never used rototillers or any other kind of machinery. I've always used hand tools, but even then I suppose I've displaced some kind of animal life.

I'm a radical when it comes to the harm that humans do to the Earth. I sometimes wonder where we came from and why we are here, because we don't fit in with the rest of the natural world.

nstinks writes:

in response to eddiefiler:

David:

I don't think you quite understand how I think about eating animals. For the past 30 years I've done a lot of reading about how animals are raised on the modern corporate farms, and how they are are abused on farms, stock yards and slaughter houses. It is not a pretty picture. I can't begin to tell you the amount of suffering that these millions of poor creatures have to endure just so that the meat industry can make huge profits off the suffering of animals and the gullibility of the human animal. Humans think that just because they are at the top of the food chain, they have the right to do anything they want to animals that are lesser than they are. I've read some horror stories about how animals are treated. One of the reasons I can't eat meat is because I think about the terrible suffering that the flesh had to endure at the hands of those who couldn't care less about animal suffering.

I've also read a lot about health, and more and more health authorities are coming to the conclusion that a meatless diet is much healthier. A vegan has a much greater chance of not developing cancers of the digestive tract that are killing lots of people every year.

As far as small animals being killed while fields are being tilled before planting crops, I abhor that also, but no matter what humans do, they can't be completely blameless from causing some kind of harm to other life forms and the environment. Our primitive ancestors caused much less harm to the Earth than modern man does. Primitive man didn't build roads, drive automobiles, ride in airplanes, have large corporate farms. They lived with nature and were a part of nature. Yes, they ate meat, but they didn't raise other animals on corporate farms or in boxes like calves are for veal or pregnant pigs raised in small crates where they can't turn around. Our modern farms create an enormous amount of wastes that pollute our water, and ravage the land. Cattle in the west have destroyed thousands of acres of native grasses.

Yes, I agree that I am responsible for some loss of life if I eat produce from the grocery store. In the past I've always tried to grow as much of my own food as possible in my home garden. I have never used rototillers or any other kind of machinery. I've always used hand tools, but even then I suppose I've displaced some kind of animal life.

I'm a radical when it comes to the harm that humans do to the Earth. I sometimes wonder where we came from and why we are here, because we don't fit in with the rest of the natural world.

Eddie.......can you provide a time when man ever fit in with the "natural world?"

You seem to wish for the "good old days" of horse and plow.

Oh wait.......that would be exploiting animals.

Do us all a favor.

You eat what you like through whatever organic gardening means that makes you happy.

Please let me do the same.......Don't force your ideology on others.

eddiefiler writes:

nstinks:

I'm not trying to force anything on anyone. How could I do that? Meat eating is entrenched, and I and other vegans are vastly outnumbered. All we can do is tell other people what we have discovered, and if you don't want to go along, we can't help it.

What about the tea party? Aren't you doing the same things that you are accusing me of? You give your opinions just as much as I do. Why do you feel threatened when someone says something you disagree with?

I suppose you are against it when someone or the government tries to get people to stop smoking. If no one ever said what is wrong with our society, we would have a much worse world than we already have. I should think that you as a tea party leader would welcome it when someone tries to tell the truth about our corporate factory farms and how they are doing a disservice to the welfare of humanity and contributing to animal cruelty. Practice what you preach.

Neal writes:

I'm not defending Eddie here but I can't ever remember him saying he has NO impact on animal life. And I do have to agree with him on the absolutely deplorable and down right NASTY conditions at some big corporate farms. And at some smaller farms too though that is not mentioned so much in the media unless it turns out to be a "puppy" mill or some such.

I have never seen a recorded case of any animal being a vegetarian or vegan. But that is probably because being such is a choice and not a result of biology. However there are huge amounts of cases of carnivores and herbivores "cross feeding" for various reasons. Usually as aids to digestion or a short fall in the normal food supply.

“It's very sad that humans can't respect the lives of other species. I'm a vegan, and I think that other animals have just as much right to live as I do.” – Eddie Filer

While I respect Eddie's opinion I just can't agree with it. First he is lumping all humans as having no respect for animals and that is just not true. Second if it came down to a choice between saving an animal and a person I truly can not see where the animal has any rights what so ever.

While I haven't hunted in literally decades, I don't need the meat, I definitely disagree with "trophy" hunting or fishing. I was taught at an early age, with Dad's belt, that if you kill it you darn well better have a reason for it. Either you need the meat or it is a danger to people. And tormenting an animal was just not done.

NZDirector writes:

Eddie,

Thanks for the honest and productive feedback. And for admitting that we are all culpable in some way for animal death or discomfort.

And despite my perceived taking you personally to task I have always respected your convictions over the years. And despite being polar opposites we do have some common ground. I think corporate farming is basically animal torture. I know even hunters who are used to killing but won't buy chicken anymore because of the ways they are raised by the big companies. I don't like fur farms or dog racing either.

And for the record to my critics, I am a meat hunter, not a trophy hunter. I only wish I had more time to hunt. I feel guilty when I have to buy meat at the supermarket; it's not nearly as good for you as organic meat from the woods and it shows I have not provided for my family in a traditional way.

eddiefiler writes:

To Neal and Dave:

When I said that humans don't have respect for animals, I didn't mean all humans. I used the word humans to signify the culture of humanity. A lot of people don't even know what animal welfare and animal rights means. When I said that animals have just as much right to live as I do, I didn't use a very good choice of words. I believe there are times to kill animals, such as if they are suffering and little or nothing can be done for them. I try to be balanced. If there are too many cats and dogs, I see nothing wrong if they are euthonized. It's hard to be balanced, because people are so polarized in our society. I don't like to see animals abused or treated inhumanely.

If everyone went out and hunted their own meat, there soon wouldn't be any wild animals left. The human population has increased to the point where that would be impractical. I don't have all the answers to all of the problems of the world as to how we interact with animals, but I do know there is a lot of unneccesary suffering such as people dealing in unlawful trading of exotic animals and a lot of our zoos and circuses are not treating their animals humanely etc.

I hope that Dave treats his animals humanely, but if not, I'm sure I'd have heard about it. I personally don't like to see animals caged. This is a cruel world for both animals and humans, and all we can do is try in our own little ways to alleviate some of it by helping people become aware of what is going on.

I'm probably one of the most misunderstood people in Naples, because I tell people what I honestly think. Sometimes I don't do a very good job expressing my feelings. I have even changed my ideas about certain things from time to time as I gain a clearer understanding of the subject.

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