Making the grade: No failing elementary, middle schools in Collier

Elementary and middle school grades have been released.

In Collier County, there were 22 A's, six B's, 10 C's, four D's and no F's. Statewide, 89 percent of schools (2,301) earned an A, B, or C grade and 11 percent (285) earned a D or F grade.

Of 67 school districts, five, including Collier, saw an increase in the number of A's. Last year, the district had 16 A's.

Schools in south Lee County fared well too: Bonita Springs Elementary - C (2012), B (2011); Pinewoods Elementary - A for 2011 and 2012; Treeline and Spring Creek elementary schools, Bonita Springs Middle and Bonita Springs Prepartory and Fitness Academy - B (2012), A (2011); and San Carlos Park Elementary - C (2012), B (2011).

Receiving A's in 2011 and this year: Rayma C. Page and Three Oaks elementaries, Three Oaks Middle and Bonita Springs Charter.

This year's school grades were calculated using more difficult standards.

A breakdown of Collier schools' grades, 2012 and 2011:

Gulfview Middle A, A

Lake Park Elementary A, B

Tommie Barfield Elementary A, A

Shadowlawn Elementary B, B

Pinecrest Elementary C, D

Sea Gate Elementary A, A

Highlands Elementary C, C

Lake Trafford Elementary D, D

Avalon Elementary C, C

East Naples Middle A, A

Poinciana Elementary B, B

Golden Gate Elementary C, D

Naples Park Elementary A, A

Pine Ridge Middle A, A

Golden Gate Middle B, B

Big Cypress Elementary A, A

Village Oaks Elementary C, C

Golden Terrace Elementary C, D

Immokalee Middle C, B

Vineyards Elementary A, A

Lely Elementary B, C

Laurel Oak Elementary A, A

Oakridge Middle A, A

Manatee Elementary A, C

Manatee Middle C, B

Pelican Marsh Elementary A, A

Corkscrew Elementary B, B

Corkscrew Middle A, A

Osceola Elementary A, B

North Naples Middle A, A

Calusa Park Elementary A, B

Sabal Palm Elementary C, C

Cypress Palm Middle B, B

Estates Elementary A, B

Veterans Memorial Elementary A, A

Mike Davis Elementary A, A

Palmetto Elementary A, B

Parkside Elementary D, D

Eden Park Elementary D, C

Marco Island Charter Middle A, A

Immokalee Community D, C

Marco Island Academy C, none

To view grades for additional schools, visit http://schoolgrades.fldoe.org/

Continue to follow this story at naplesnews.com.

© 2012 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 19

cons3rvative writes:

great job collier county teachers ....wonder why naples news buried this great news? they always seem to put the negative education news at the top

nplsparentof2 writes:

Congratulations to our students, teachers and staff.

nplsparentof2 writes:

Interesting - Immokalee Community and Marco Island Academy are listed as charter schools with the district website... wonder why they didn't do as well as Marco Island Charter Middle. Maybe those blanket statements about charter schools always being better are wrong?

swfl_ff writes:

Considering all the changes made to the FCAT this year these results are pretty good overall. Good job to the students, teachers and the parents. All three groups are what will make a difference in a child's education.

Sane_in_Florida (Inactive) writes:

OK so the Principals and senior administrators at the four D schools are going to forgo bonuses and be reprimanded right....cuz they always wanna fry the teachers.

I would imagine this puts the Union in a much better bargaining position with a 37.5% increase in A schools YOY.

teachtrouble1 writes:

I find it interesting that Marco Island Accad was only a C, a lot of people in that community have been highly judgemental of the public schools on the east end and they themselves only get a C! I find that interesting. All in all the grades looked good for the district. Middle schools did very well for the most part.

neapolitan100 writes:

Based on performance, I would say that the teachers deserve to keep their step increases, not lose them. Shame on those at the top who are raking in big salaries out of the trenches and who have forgotten their roots... Teaching.

dwyerj1 writes:

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012...

Published on Wednesday, July 11, 2012 by Common Dreams
Addiction to High Stakes Testing is Killing US Education
by Jim Horn

4marcoisland writes:

The grade for Marco Island Academy is not accurate. The FCAT results were good at the school. The problem is that 50% of the school grade is based on learning gains for students. Many of the kids who attended the school moved from out of state, were previously home-schooled or transferred from private school. Learning gains are calculated based on a comparison of last years FCAT results to this years FCAT results. If the student didn't take an FCAT last year (ex. home school, private school, out of state) there is no baseline to compare their learning gains. Therefore they are counted as not having a learning gain which is inaccurate. Unfortunately, the state does not take this into consideration when determining the school grade.

cardinal21 writes:

in response to thepartyofknow:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Oh brother, what a comment.

funhaha writes:

To 4MarcoIsland: the same is said for public schools. Children withdraw, come from out of state, transfer from private school, or were home-schooled. Same for public.

4marcoisland writes:

in response to funhaha:

To 4MarcoIsland: the same is said for public schools. Children withdraw, come from out of state, transfer from private school, or were home-schooled. Same for public.

True, but MIA had a higher percentage of students who moved from out of state, home-schooled or transferred from private school than any of the other district schools. In addition it had a much smaller student population (68 kids) vs. the hundreds or thousands at other public schools. A small change makes a huge impact on school of this size.

Notice too that none of the other high school grades are out yet. Last year they weren't released until Jan...

Bottom line is that the school grade provides a great baseline for next year.

justme writes:

in response to 4marcoisland:

True, but MIA had a higher percentage of students who moved from out of state, home-schooled or transferred from private school than any of the other district schools. In addition it had a much smaller student population (68 kids) vs. the hundreds or thousands at other public schools. A small change makes a huge impact on school of this size.

Notice too that none of the other high school grades are out yet. Last year they weren't released until Jan...

Bottom line is that the school grade provides a great baseline for next year.

Bottom line is that the school grade doesn't mean jack crap!

Comparing this year's 10th graders with last year's, and you call that growth? Ha! Funny!

Assessing 50% of the math teachers' evaluations based on FCAT reading scores? Bogus!

Counting every student who leaves the school (moves, drops out, dies) as a drop out? Puh-lease!

This is insanity. I've taught in four different countries, and by far MY country (the good ole U S of A) is the one going down the drain. Even developing countries south of our border have it figured out. We're heading in the same direction.

tnazmom writes:

Isn't it ironic that the article about the district, teachers and students possibly doing something commendable has 15 blog posts, but the one about teachers' pay has 144 (mostly negative) comments. It's such a sad reflection on this community and our society that people will never miss an opportunity to bash teachers, yet they don't have anything nice to say if it even looks for a minute that we may have done a good job at something. And people want to know what's wrong with our system!

twosuns writes:

in response to tnazmom:

Isn't it ironic that the article about the district, teachers and students possibly doing something commendable has 15 blog posts, but the one about teachers' pay has 144 (mostly negative) comments. It's such a sad reflection on this community and our society that people will never miss an opportunity to bash teachers, yet they don't have anything nice to say if it even looks for a minute that we may have done a good job at something. And people want to know what's wrong with our system!

I was thinking the same thing. The teachers deserve credit here but instead people are belly aching over the teachers pay. Sadly I am sure those nay-sayers are disappointed the schools are improving.

elf writes:

Ah the reason we're balking over pay is we're BROKE.

justme writes:

in response to elf:

Ah the reason we're balking over pay is we're BROKE.

If we're broke, then we need to cut out some of the fat that sitting around there floating at the top. A good 1/4 of those people warming those $400 office chairs with their flabby rears are not needed, plain and simple. Time to skim the fat!

Or what about half of the computer technicians, or spend half their time surfing the web and posting on Facebook instead of fixing things? We could easily get rid of half of them.

And how about cutting paper waste by NOT sending out paper interims anymore? Parents have 24/7 access to their children's grades. A simple quarter report card should suffice.

nplsparentof2 writes:

in response to justme:

If we're broke, then we need to cut out some of the fat that sitting around there floating at the top. A good 1/4 of those people warming those $400 office chairs with their flabby rears are not needed, plain and simple. Time to skim the fat!

Or what about half of the computer technicians, or spend half their time surfing the web and posting on Facebook instead of fixing things? We could easily get rid of half of them.

And how about cutting paper waste by NOT sending out paper interims anymore? Parents have 24/7 access to their children's grades. A simple quarter report card should suffice.

RE - grades/interims - only parents of middle and high school students can access grades online. elementary students do not, so there should still be a paper interim for them. Otherwise, I agree (or at least target paper reports to parents without computer access).

anotherPOV writes:

1/4? Half, easily.
The paper is the only proof of communication. If by some miracle the district actually held a student accountable and failed them the first thing a parent claims is they were never told of the issues regarding their angel. No matter how many phone calls are made, it is never enough. With paper copies the schools can say ,with certainty, that the parents were informed of the child's progress at least 7 times before the end of the year.

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