Hot homes: Two Naples mansions sell for more than $40 million each

Greg Kahn/Staff
The home at 3100 Gordon Drive in Naples recently sold for $47.3 million.

Photo by GREG KAHN // Buy this photo

Greg Kahn/Staff The home at 3100 Gordon Drive in Naples recently sold for $47.3 million.

Greg Kahn/Staff 
 The home at 2100 Gordon Drive in Naples recently sold for $42 million.

Photo by GREG KAHN, Naples Daily News // Buy this photo

Greg Kahn/Staff The home at 2100 Gordon Drive in Naples recently sold for $42 million.

Two is better than one.

Naples has seen two record home sales in less than two months. Two beach-front mansions on Gordon Drive in the Port Royal area — a haven for the ultrarich — recently sold for more than $40 million each, beating a record set in 2007.

One of the estates fetched nearly $47.3 million in an all-cash deal, making it the most expensive home ever sold in Naples. The other went for $42 million, putting it in second place.

"That's amazing, if you think about it," remarked Naples developer Jack Antaramian, who sold his home on Gordon Drive late last year.

Boosted by the record sales, the Port Royal area has seen more than $160 million worth of property exchange hands since January, said Philip Collins, a broker associate for Premier Sotheby's International in Naples. There were four sales made for more than $10 million.

"What we are finding out is that people that have the disposable income to purchase such a property find it somewhat of a safe haven, relatively speaking. I think they think it's a good investment from the standpoint that the real estate market is coming back and it's coming back rather strong and they do not make anymore waterfront," Collins said.

Naples isn't the only market attracting the attention of billionaires. The Miami market has seen some eyebrow-raising home sales of its own in the past year, including a sprawling estate that recently sold for about $40 million on the exclusive Indian Creek island.

The two record-breaking sales in Naples were made in March and April. Local Realtors sold them privately, so the homes were never publicly listed on a multiple listing service, or MLS.

Jim Forrest, owner of Forrest International Realty in Naples, represented the seller of the most expensive home, which has 23,000 square feet of living space and 275 feet of frontage on the beach. He described it as one of the top five most valuable single-family homes in Naples. The original asking price was $55 million.

"I have very deep connections worldwide that can write a check for these types of properties, and I basically facilitated the deal in a day or two," Forrest said.

He said the home, built in 2009, was a unique find because of everything it had to offer. It has five bedrooms and seven bathrooms and includes a library, an office and a pool overlooking the Gulf of Mexico.

The property last sold for about $13.8 million in 2004, county records show.

"It's one of the most magnificent parcels in Naples that happens to be in Port Royal," Forrest said. "If somebody flies by it, they can see it's just a rare commodity."

The most recent sellers were listed as Gardner and Jane Larned. The buyer was Randal Bellestri, a U.S. entrepreneur who sold two tool-making businesses to Hampson Industries, an aerospace company in the United Kingdom, in 2008, reportedly for more than $250 million.

Property records show Bellestri also owns vacant residential lots in Naples on Gulf Shore Boulevard, Seventh Avenue North and on Nelson's Walk, valued at more than $19 million.

The second mansion that fetched $42 million in Naples was sold to an unknown buyer, going under the name Harold Square Land Trust. The seller was the Susan McCurry Revocable Trust. The asking price was $47 million.

The home, stretching a little over 15,800 square feet, sits on more than three acres, including 200 feet of frontage on the beach. The sale also included a guest house at just under 2,000 square feet. There's a tennis court and a so-called infinity pool, which appears to drop off into the nearby Gulf of Mexico.

Paul Graffy, a Realtor with Premier Sotheby's International Realty in Naples, handled the deal for the seller. He signed a confidentiality agreement that doesn't allow him to talk about the specifics of the sale, or even the interior of the home.

The property last sold for about $18.1 million in 2000, according to county records.

After getting the private listing, Graffy had it under contract within 15 days, said Craig Jones, a vice president of marketing for Premier Sotheby's.

"The quality of the property, with that kind of exposure, 200-foot exposure, on the beach made it extremely appealing," she said. "There has not been a huge inventory of that quality property on the sands. So it's very sought after."

The record home sale in Naples had been $40 million. That now twice-beaten record was set in 2007, when Arthur L. Allen Jr., the founder of a Naples-based software provider, bought a waterfront mansion on nearly five acres on Gordon Drive. It too was marketed privately.

The highest end of the Naples market continues to strengthen, Collins said.

Some wealthy investors are pulling their money out of the stock market and putting it into real estate, as a way to diversify their holdings, he said.

In the Port Royal area, there have been 13 sales this year and another 14 are under contract and pending, Collins said. There are about 100 homes and lots for sale in the area, which he said is normal for this time of year.

One day, local Realtors say they wouldn't be surprised to see a beach-front mansion in Naples selling for $100 million, if land prices continue to rise and the sprawling estates built over the past five or six years come to market.

"There are still a number of significant properties on the beach not yet brought to market and we don't know if they are coming to market," said Jones, with Premier Sotheby's. "But we still think there are a huge number of valuable opportunities there."

Connect with Laura Layden at www.naplesnews.com/staff/laura_layden

© 2012 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 59

Gosh writes:

Gosh

cabagepalm writes:

This is great news. I hope it doesn't take long for it to trickle across I75.

savethewhalz writes:

Impressive. I'm guessing high end Naples realtors are in perpetual orgasm needing towels and cigarettes.

Kyser851 writes:

YEAH!!!!

FLsouth writes:

The city may have to fire some people and gut some pensions over this.. Oh wait

Creep writes:

Guess my offer was rejected

BobinNaples writes:

Yay! More millionaires in the area means more jobs creation.

LOL republicans.

mr_1_term_proposition writes:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Opinionated writes:

in response to Creep:

Guess my offer was rejected

Mine to.

cozyboy writes:

BORING

RainMan writes:

Hmm... what does it mean?

"Conspirousy theory #1" ... don't use spell check :)

We all know that Naples realestate hasn't climbed that much in value, then again... is the dollar worth that much less?

If people are moveing that kind of money out of the stock market... is it about time for it to collapse again?

The buyers must be related to someone running the printing presses at the Fed.

This is going to be an interesting year :)

almasonlybar writes:

Pretty garish, in-you-face showmanship at a time when most Americans are struggling. The carbon footprint notwithstanding, this is not just a bit much, but a lot much. Must be compensating for shortcomings, both physically and intellectually.

native_at_heart writes:

<shaking my head> hypothetically let's say I'm a billionaire (just made myself laugh) but even if I was I still would not need or want that much house!! It's obscene to me to pay that kind of money for a house when it could be put to better use helping others in the community.

HarryNuts writes:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Sick writes:

News flash there are Billionaires that have multiple homes worth 40 million and up in multiple cities.

Including Naples.

Billionaires are the new millionaires.

If you don't have at least 1 billion in cash you aint much these days.

Shhhsh..........

dwyerj1 writes:

Maybe, with all that clout, these new homeowners can do something about the risks of drilling the Gulf for oil.

Corexit did not make Deepwater Horizon go away.

Our Congressional Representatives rarely represent my views.

angrytxpyr writes:

Low TAXES, free utilities on the backs of the rabble East of 41 and North of 5thave south and their own private cops and firefighters all on the backs of the working class unfortunate enough to be City of Naples residents or utility customers. The only thing that seems to be left to make it a perfect world for the privileged few is to get rid of the stinky county residents using the Cesspool of a bay and then successfully picking the pockets of County TAXPAYERS to make another half arsed attempt to fix that same body water the City's own dumping of chlorinated crap water polluted in the first place, but seem to think that water filtration park we already paid for somehow isn't enough.

KR writes:

Someone needs to cut their grass,trim the bushes,clean the house, wash their clothes etc.....jobs created!

unfatcat writes:

Personally, I am glad that at least a certain section of town has viable growing assets and can then pay real estate taxes, which translate into roads, school, and law enforcement jobs. But it is maddening how wide the gap of income, ownership, and opportunity has become in SW Florida, probably in Florida generally.

A couple of months ago, Cape Coral was deemed to be the #1 city of middle-class murging into lower class in the entire U.S. When one understands how much income is missing from people's pockets, along with severe housing devalations in middle-class neighborhoods (bank sold properties);it starts to mean something.

I read a report this week that was a bit unnerving--middle income today in America apparently includes household incomes making $20,000 - $80,000 (household is the keyword here). Are the 50% not paying Federal taxes making less than $20,000 annually for their households? How does one even dream of going to college in this situation?

When the average car to get to work costs more than one's entire annual household income, it makes it very difficult for the working class to keep their heads above water and to opt to take on a job that pays the average $8.50 per hour/ 20 hours per week.

BBGobserver writes:

With story like this purporting to be news, and in a way, it is, the need for a new tax on millionaires becomes more apparent. In looking back over the past fifty years, the highest tax rates for the wealthy were well in excess of 50%. And the wealthy lived quite nicely sharing more than half of their income with the federal government. We have morphed into a welfare society that has the largest military industrial complex in the world and no one wants to pay for it especially the super rich. These sales along with soaring deficits are mile markers for why the U.S. needs a new income tax policy.....and fast.

CarpeVeritas writes:

in response to almasonlybar:

Pretty garish, in-you-face showmanship at a time when most Americans are struggling. The carbon footprint notwithstanding, this is not just a bit much, but a lot much. Must be compensating for shortcomings, both physically and intellectually.

Best line about people who need such ostentatious display: "They and their money are not well acquainted."

I remember in the 1960s that one of our neighbors bought a new Cadillac convertible every year. Every year the whole family climbed in and drove through town, honking and waving at the pedestrians.

Same folks, different century.

HarryNuts writes:

in response to KR:

Someone needs to cut their grass,trim the bushes,clean the house, wash their clothes etc.....jobs created!

You are an idiot.

Maggotbrain writes:

native_at_heart says:

"<shaking my head> hypothetically let's say I'm a billionaire (just made myself laugh) but even if I was I still would not need or want that much house!! It's obscene to me to pay that kind of money for a house when it could be put to better use helping others in the community."

You have no idea whether or to what extent the purchasers of these homes make charitable contributions. The homes already existed. SOMEBODY was going to buy them. When did envy become a virtue?

almasonlybar says

"Pretty garish, in-you-face showmanship at a time when most Americans are struggling. The carbon footprint notwithstanding, this is not just a bit much, but a lot much. Must be compensating for shortcomings, both physically and intellectually."

It is hard to get that rich by being s-----. The opposite is also true. You are the proof.

dwyerji says:

"Our Congressional Representatives rarely represent my views."

Thats because it is hard to get elected to congress spouting outlandish leftwing cant.

Only-Real writes:

Sick,
Is your real name "Harold Square Land Trust"?

tampacoco writes:

What Country were the Buyers from ? LOL

beerbong writes:

Not many things like this impress me anymore. Been in Florida too long.

gladesgator writes:

Anyone been in a third world country lately? Continuous brownouts, noisy fleets of motorcycles, little children following with hands held out. What we need to do is to try to be content, follow Jesus - his life and commands, and work to impliment good just laws and responsible government. Who new that beach front property would one day be so valuable anyway? Did the first Floridians that built shacks near the water know how rich they were. Perhaps we are also rich in ways that we don't recognize.

Max_Headroom writes:

in response to KR:

Someone needs to cut their grass,trim the bushes,clean the house, wash their clothes etc.....jobs created!

So very true!

You know darn well that Democrats COULDN'T do this!!!!!!!

Make jobs, that is.

native_at_heart writes:

in response to Maggotbrain:

native_at_heart says:

"<shaking my head> hypothetically let's say I'm a billionaire (just made myself laugh) but even if I was I still would not need or want that much house!! It's obscene to me to pay that kind of money for a house when it could be put to better use helping others in the community."

You have no idea whether or to what extent the purchasers of these homes make charitable contributions. The homes already existed. SOMEBODY was going to buy them. When did envy become a virtue?

almasonlybar says

"Pretty garish, in-you-face showmanship at a time when most Americans are struggling. The carbon footprint notwithstanding, this is not just a bit much, but a lot much. Must be compensating for shortcomings, both physically and intellectually."

It is hard to get that rich by being s-----. The opposite is also true. You are the proof.

dwyerji says:

"Our Congressional Representatives rarely represent my views."

Thats because it is hard to get elected to congress spouting outlandish leftwing cant.

No where did I say they don't give to charitable organizations. I hope and assume they do. But let's do some simple math. Let's pretend on average with all the abandoned and foreclosed properties out there that one could pick up a house for ...say 80,000.00 the same money that bought ONE of these homes could have housed 500+ families!!

Envy...you couldn't be more wrong maggot.

o2cool writes:

And, if you think your taxes are too high, go and see Julian Stokes at the Propery Appraiser's office and I'll betcha' he'll lower the assessment and ask Tallahasse for a refund on your taxes. He likes doing that for his rich friends.

AM_Johnny writes:

Yo dawg, I been casin dat joint for months now. Home invasion anyone....

Maggotbrain writes:

"...the same money that bought ONE of these homes could have housed 500+ families!!"

You've taken upon yourself the two easiest jobs in the world: improving other people's morals and spending other people's money.

Be sure to let everyone know when you take the cash out of YOUR residence and buy a foreclosed home for even one of the families whose fate you lament.

If you are NOT treating envy as a virtue, you are elevating jealousy to a moral principle, provided of course your hypocritical compassion redistributes somebody else's wealth.

Klaatu writes:

Aren't private listings(aka pocket listings) Illegal ?

swfljim writes:

in response to Klaatu:

Aren't private listings(aka pocket listings) Illegal ?

There is no law or rule that forces a Realtor to place a listing on the MLS and/or market it in any particular way. So the answer to your queston is no.

gna writes:

And we can't end the Bush Tax cuts because the economy would crash and burn if the 1 percenter's MARGINAL..not EFFECTIVE tax rates went from 35 to 39.6? An increase of 4.6%???? So, assuming his income was totally from 250 million sale of his company, his Bush Tax cut bill would be 88 million and his expired Bush Tax cut bill would be 99 million. An increase of 11 million. This jamoke just bought a house for 40 million but would drop out of the economy for an extra 11 million???? Wait..it gets worse...his tax rate would have been only 15% as it would be from capital gains and under the Ryan/Romney path to prosperity his tax bill would be ZERO!!! Like my dear old daddy used to say..."Who's sh%$##ng who?"

native_at_heart writes:

in response to Maggotbrain:

"...the same money that bought ONE of these homes could have housed 500+ families!!"

You've taken upon yourself the two easiest jobs in the world: improving other people's morals and spending other people's money.

Be sure to let everyone know when you take the cash out of YOUR residence and buy a foreclosed home for even one of the families whose fate you lament.

If you are NOT treating envy as a virtue, you are elevating jealousy to a moral principle, provided of course your hypocritical compassion redistributes somebody else's wealth.

Let me guess...your parents are cousins right? I never said that is what these buyers should do with their money. Re-read my original post s-l-o-w-l-y. I said if I as in referring to MYSELF was a billionaire I (referring to myself again here if I lost you already)would not need or want such a home. Since we don't know one anyone, which I consider a blessing, you have no idea of the lengths I would go to help another person should I have the means to do so. maggot.

forge198 writes:

in response to BobinNaples:

Yay! More millionaires in the area means more jobs creation.

LOL republicans.

Yay, more helpful comments from the left!

LOL hippies.

nativeonepointone writes:

in response to native_at_heart:

Let me guess...your parents are cousins right? I never said that is what these buyers should do with their money. Re-read my original post s-l-o-w-l-y. I said if I as in referring to MYSELF was a billionaire I (referring to myself again here if I lost you already)would not need or want such a home. Since we don't know one anyone, which I consider a blessing, you have no idea of the lengths I would go to help another person should I have the means to do so. maggot.

Not many people down here know what selflessishness means.

warrenfire writes:

in response to Maggotbrain:

"...the same money that bought ONE of these homes could have housed 500+ families!!"

You've taken upon yourself the two easiest jobs in the world: improving other people's morals and spending other people's money.

Be sure to let everyone know when you take the cash out of YOUR residence and buy a foreclosed home for even one of the families whose fate you lament.

If you are NOT treating envy as a virtue, you are elevating jealousy to a moral principle, provided of course your hypocritical compassion redistributes somebody else's wealth.

How will you counsel when the rabble is at the gates with torches and pitchforks?

cabagepalm writes:

KR and MAX get it. The rest will never get it. It's the old fish story.

cabagepalm writes:

Teach a man to fish and he'll feed himself. Give a man a fish and you'll be feeding him the rest of your life.

cobra writes:

in response to angrytxpyr:

Low TAXES, free utilities on the backs of the rabble East of 41 and North of 5thave south and their own private cops and firefighters all on the backs of the working class unfortunate enough to be City of Naples residents or utility customers. The only thing that seems to be left to make it a perfect world for the privileged few is to get rid of the stinky county residents using the Cesspool of a bay and then successfully picking the pockets of County TAXPAYERS to make another half arsed attempt to fix that same body water the City's own dumping of chlorinated crap water polluted in the first place, but seem to think that water filtration park we already paid for somehow isn't enough.

With the sell of those houses and the taxes paid the Fire Dept might stop chasing EMS. Oh, wait. They need more for pensions and health insurance.

BigOrangeKitty writes:

in response to KR:

Someone needs to cut their grass,trim the bushes,clean the house, wash their clothes etc.....jobs created!

The previous owner probably had the grass cut, the house cleaned, etc. So those jobs will probably continue to exist, but new jobs? I don't think so. Not unless the new owner opens a business here.

BonitaBuoy writes:

in response to savethewhalz:

Impressive. I'm guessing high end Naples realtors are in perpetual orgasm needing towels and cigarettes.

Bahahahahaha!

Kyser851 writes:

in response to Klaatu:

Aren't private listings(aka pocket listings) Illegal ?

The answer is no. And the list of people who can afford this home would fit in your pocket with that pocket listing!

angrytxpyr writes:

in response to cobra:

With the sell of those houses and the taxes paid the Fire Dept might stop chasing EMS. Oh, wait. They need more for pensions and health insurance.

Nhah that ain't gonna happen in the City-O-Naples, not anymore.

Any extra that goes to the Fire Department is gonna be shuffled over to the $590,000 fire boat, oh and lets not forget the specialize crew to operate the Port Royale fire boat oh I mean the City's fire boat.

Lets not forget the monument to Mac, Ernie & Steves Ego's and $3.4 million for the new Fire Station across the street from the existing Fire Station he just blew $225,000 on for a world class kitchen, flooring and some new paint inside. Is it true he didn't get those nasty old bathrooms fixed up even a little.

I don't think there will be much left after he gets done with any money NFD gets.

I talked with a few of the people on the City of Naples health insurance and I gotta tell yah it ain't no deal and a couple that have your namesake "Cobra" coverage, HOLY CRAP I think I'd rather wait until 65 to get treatment for anything or just die instead of paying the premium.

The way Gary(dumb dumb dum dum)Price, Boss Moss, Lap Dog Rog and the rest of those mental midgets down there are screwing up the pensions there might not be anything left to pay out what they owe in a few years. I heard it was so bad that one of those Erected(yeh right) Officials down there asked the Governor to try and work his felonious magic and try to help out the City with their idea for a fix.

Hey wait do those houses have some of those trick water meters that Boss Moss was talking about that read less gallons than actually used? Hey I've heard that if you know the right people on the second floor of City Hall you can get one of them and if they like you(cause you do stuff for them)your meter might even run backwards and you will get a refund check every two months courtesy of the Riff Raff who pay their bills. Is that right Boss Moss?

JunkYardDog_1 (Inactive) writes:

I watched the old house that use to sit on this property be raised and this house being built a few years back while working for some customers next door. It has 900+ pilings to support the new structure, under mansion parking along with several elevators. The original owners were a couple in their late 40 with no children. I'd say it was a tad much for a couple of rich yupsters. But hey, who am I to say. To each his own.

Beachglow writes:

in response to unfatcat:

Personally, I am glad that at least a certain section of town has viable growing assets and can then pay real estate taxes, which translate into roads, school, and law enforcement jobs. But it is maddening how wide the gap of income, ownership, and opportunity has become in SW Florida, probably in Florida generally.

A couple of months ago, Cape Coral was deemed to be the #1 city of middle-class murging into lower class in the entire U.S. When one understands how much income is missing from people's pockets, along with severe housing devalations in middle-class neighborhoods (bank sold properties);it starts to mean something.

I read a report this week that was a bit unnerving--middle income today in America apparently includes household incomes making $20,000 - $80,000 (household is the keyword here). Are the 50% not paying Federal taxes making less than $20,000 annually for their households? How does one even dream of going to college in this situation?

When the average car to get to work costs more than one's entire annual household income, it makes it very difficult for the working class to keep their heads above water and to opt to take on a job that pays the average $8.50 per hour/ 20 hours per week.

If you want to increase your salary from the lows of 20,000 or so, you educate yourself and get a better job making more money. Then you save and invest and eventually you'll achieve the American dream. Pretty easy if you ask me.
You get what your work for in life....

RickScott writes:

Ok ok. It was me. I bought it as a winter home.

BillBrasky writes:

The middle class is all but disappearing while the number of impoverished Americans grows exponentially (up to one in six).

As the Republicans pull the copper wiring from the walls of America they point to the fact that the number of billionaires has doubled.

My question is: what's more important, that the middle class is turing into the poor and the poor are becoming impoverished or that a tiny group of people made HUGE gains at everyone else expense and got away with it?

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