Endorsement editorial: Collier, Lee Mosquito Control boards

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Southwest Florida boasts two high-performing agencies that make living here tolerable.

The mosquito control boards of Collier and Lee counties are key players in public health and welfare.

The fact that we seldom hear complaints about bugs, noise from spray planes or toxicity from chemicals ought to tell us something about the elected officials who are in charge.

This year the only two board seats on the Nov. 6 ballot -- one in each county -- are held by high-quality public servants.

They enjoy their specialized missions and, frankly, are capable of much higher-profile public offices. Voters can re-elect them with confidence when early voting starts Oct. 27.

In Collier, Dave Farmer, a civil engineer with a passion for the environment, seeks election after being appointed in 2010. He is a veteran of community advisory boards and the Big Cypress Basin. He is squarely focused on fiscal and ecologically friendly performance.

* Also in race: Matt Novak.

* Who can vote? All 177,000 voters in Collier County.

* Questions? Call the Collier County Supervisor of Elections at 252-8450.

In Lee, the dean of our region's mosquito control leaders, Larry Murphy, wants to keep going after 12 years of service.

This retired veterinarian brings special insights about the importance of mosquito control to people as well as pets.

The bottom line: This lifetime resident of Lee knows what he is doing and helps make the community a safer place to live.

* Also in race: Melissa Dortch.

* Who can vote: All 376,000 voters in Lee.

* Questions? Call the Lee County Supervisor of Elections at 533-8683.

© 2012 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 4

swamp4ever writes:

Yep, Lee County taxpayers sure are getting their best bang for their buck!

http://www.sunshinestatenews.com/stor...

"With an annual budget of $22 million, Lee's mosquito district spends more than 46 other mosquito districts -- combined.

But Lee County, in Southwest Florida, is a glaring exception. With a seven-member elected board and 68 employees, the independent mosquito district's payroll works out to an average of $118,000 per worker.

The district also holds the distinction of having the 11th-highest compensated retiree in the state's pension system. Former executive director T. Wayne Miller, who retired in 1994, currently receives $172,027 a year."

John_Galt writes:

I'm voting for Novak!

As a life long resident of Collier County and a Biology major, Matt brings a fresh and knowledgeable perspective to this office and wants to look at less invasive procedures to control mosquitoes that will minimize the harmful chemicals into the environment without having to continually increase the millage rates.

John_Adams writes:

Novaks lifetime consists of 20 years, hes a school student still living at home and never held a job.
Any voter that thinks he's the best bet needs to head to the Dr to have their head examined.

David Farmer on the other hand is a community Leader, serving on several County Boards over the years.Highly respected and endorsed by the Naples Daily News, which I can see has finally decided their old way of endorsing was the wrong way.

Dave Farmer, a civil engineer with a passion for the environment, seeks election after being appointed in 2010. He is a veteran of community advisory boards and the Big Cypress Basin. He is squarely focused on fiscal and ecologically friendly performance,
capable of much higher-profile public offices. Voters can re-elect him with confidence when early voting starts Oct. 27.

There's only one choice in this race and its David Farmer, Our safety and health should not be put into the hands of a school kid.

LeeFireStudy writes:

in response to swamp4ever:

Yep, Lee County taxpayers sure are getting their best bang for their buck!

http://www.sunshinestatenews.com/stor...

"With an annual budget of $22 million, Lee's mosquito district spends more than 46 other mosquito districts -- combined.

But Lee County, in Southwest Florida, is a glaring exception. With a seven-member elected board and 68 employees, the independent mosquito district's payroll works out to an average of $118,000 per worker.

The district also holds the distinction of having the 11th-highest compensated retiree in the state's pension system. Former executive director T. Wayne Miller, who retired in 1994, currently receives $172,027 a year."

As a voter and taxpayer in the Lee County Mosquito Control District, I am well satisfied with the service provided and the low tax millage levied. Some have argued that the huge bureaucracy of Lee County government could do a better job for less money, but so far, no one has stepped up to plate to show me the money. I have even heard that Miami-Dade County handles their mosquito control program for $2 million per year, but that is utter nonsense: $2 million might pay for the insecticide they use but only a fool's optimist could believe that is the total cost of running the program there. And as for T Wayne Miller, I believe he earned his pension for the outstanding job he did.

If there is a cheaper and better way to control mosquitos here in our district, I'd sure like to read the particulars of the plan.

Brian R Juntikka

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