Bicyclist injured in crash with vehicle Monday on Collier Boulevard

Update:

A 49-year-old bicyclist was hospitalized following a crash Monday morning in North Naples.

The crash happened at 9:09 a.m. near Collier Boulevard and Tree Farm Road. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, 33-year-old Albert Carrasquillo was driving a Ford pickup when he struck Chris Christiansen, who was riding a bicycle.

Christiansen was taken to Physicians Regional Hospital for treatment. No information has been released on his condition.


Earlier reporting:

A bicyclist was injured in a crash with a vehicle Monday morning on Collier Boulevard in North Naples.

Collier County Sheriff deputies and Florida Highway Patrol troopers responded to the scene of a crash involving a pedestrian at Collier Boulevard and Tree Farm Road.

The right southbound lane of Collier Boulevard was blocked by cruisers as of 9:40 a.m.

A dispatcher said the crash involved a vehicle and a bicyclist. A pickup truck and a bike were at the intersection. No word on the seriousness of any injuries.

The call came in at 9 a.m. The scene was cleared by 9:50 a.m.

Return to naplesnews.com today for more on this breaking story.

© 2014 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 39

HenryChinaski writes:

Another one? This is why I only bike where I won't get hit.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

Another one? This is why I only bike where I won't get hit.

In your driveway?? lol---They need to run a story on all the bikers who enjoy biking and never get hit---as with even being a pedestrian, the odds are in your favor.

ibestrait writes:

I heard a report this morning that Ccllier Co. was going to ban automobiles of all types from the roadways until June 1st.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to WeThePeople2016:

In your driveway?? lol---They need to run a story on all the bikers who enjoy biking and never get hit---as with even being a pedestrian, the odds are in your favor.

No I use the multi use path that is separated from the road by a concrete curb and sometimes a strip of grass.

I do ride on the road to get from path to path but I ride off the road as much as possible.

laserjock222 writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

No I use the multi use path that is separated from the road by a concrete curb and sometimes a strip of grass.

I do ride on the road to get from path to path but I ride off the road as much as possible.

I hope you stay under 5 mph. Otherwise we will be reading about you in the paper.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to laserjock222:

I hope you stay under 5 mph. Otherwise we will be reading about you in the paper.

In congested areas going slower is required. Stretches that go on uninterrupted for miles are ideal for going faster.

This is common sense and should not require explaining.

No1Uno writes:

It is clearly open season on cyclists. I want to thank the NDN in reporting each and every incident that occurs.

Hopefully the politicians of SW Florida will realize that better bike lanes and planning is needed and more important than all this fancy landscaping.

lf_photo writes:

in response to No1Uno:

It is clearly open season on cyclists. I want to thank the NDN in reporting each and every incident that occurs.

Hopefully the politicians of SW Florida will realize that better bike lanes and planning is needed and more important than all this fancy landscaping.

I agree with the sentiment, but prevention will only go so far. I think the judicial system needs to contribute with some strong deterrence in the form of stiff sentences for the maiming of people riding bikes.

NOYB5 writes:

in response to lf_photo:

I agree with the sentiment, but prevention will only go so far. I think the judicial system needs to contribute with some strong deterrence in the form of stiff sentences for the maiming of people riding bikes.

The people who designed the roads never designed a lot of them to accommodate cars and bikes at the same time.

If you drive a car 35 mph on I-75, then you are just as much of a danger to other motorists as if you drive 90 mph. That is why highways have maximum *AND* minimum speed limits.

Bikes going 15-20 mph should not be on the same roads as vehicles traveling 40+ mph. Redesign the roadways to include designated bike lanes, instead of trying to force bikes traveling half the speed of cars to occupy the same space.

Judge_Judy writes:

When riding my bike, I do not put myself in any situation that would allow a car to crush me. I do not put myself in any situation where I am at the mercy of a car driver. I do not put myself in any situation where the driver of a car controls my destiny. I do not put myself in any situation where the car driver has my life in their hands.

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to Judge_Judy:

When riding my bike, I do not put myself in any situation that would allow a car to crush me. I do not put myself in any situation where I am at the mercy of a car driver. I do not put myself in any situation where the driver of a car controls my destiny. I do not put myself in any situation where the car driver has my life in their hands.

Then you're not riding your bike for the same reasons that some of us do or must.

And that's fine, but that doesn't mean that every biker who does take to the streets deserves to be run over by a self-important motorist who can't afford a 4-8 second delay to pass a cyclist without murdering or maiming them.

BonitaTango writes:

We witnessed a phase of "suicide by police" whereas desperate individuals would provoke a police shooting...now witnessing are we a new form of insurance scam? Otherwise why would all of these sane drivers who buckle up in their car place themselves at such horrific odds to die or be maimed by collision? This unfortunately is a daily occurrence! Something must be done to stop the madness....or scam..(The scam's been done for years in our neighbor to the South which is why they offer the extra insurance if you drive through there)

Voice-of-America writes:

in response to Judge_Judy:

When riding my bike, I do not put myself in any situation that would allow a car to crush me. I do not put myself in any situation where I am at the mercy of a car driver. I do not put myself in any situation where the driver of a car controls my destiny. I do not put myself in any situation where the car driver has my life in their hands.

Thanks Judge_Judy!......So True!.....

Some people on this blog, with smaller I.Q.'s....Disagree......

They think they can win a Bike-Car collision.....

Of corse.....they voted liberal.....LOL!!....

MisterK writes:

in response to No1Uno:

It is clearly open season on cyclists. I want to thank the NDN in reporting each and every incident that occurs.

Hopefully the politicians of SW Florida will realize that better bike lanes and planning is needed and more important than all this fancy landscaping.

These collisions between cars and bikes are more frequent than reported. I think only the hospitalized and deceased make it in the paper. One thing for sure, there are lots of cyclists and cars on the road this time of year. These collisions will inevitably occur.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to Voice-of-America:

Thanks Judge_Judy!......So True!.....

Some people on this blog, with smaller I.Q.'s....Disagree......

They think they can win a Bike-Car collision.....

Of corse.....they voted liberal.....LOL!!....

Obviously--yu are not a biker--and like evry single issue from you it's I got mine and rest of you get out of my way--and you support killers who stalk and kill a teen who was unarmed and not breaking any laws, a killer who murders one teen for playing a car radio too loud, and even a gun toting movie goer who shoots and murders a Dad who was text during the PREVIEWS to assure that his baby sitter and child were secure. Just pathetic.

That's the kind of person you are, and I would not malign "Conservatives" by saying that's how they vote--you are incapable of a discussion with out relying on one or two labels (all you can handle--and you even misuse those)---

No, it's how YOU are, and how grateful the rest of the country is that you are NOT representative of any larger group.

upagain writes:

Why is this the only recreational sport that is given precedence to interact with peoples daily living. Do I have to wait for a golfer to tee off while im driving? How about if skateboarders and rollerbladers want to use our roads to? We limit golf carts going on certain roads for safety. This is a recreation and should be treated like it. A road should have max 10 k traffic count per day in order for these hobbyists to travel on.

jt1120 writes:

That's three in a 24-hour period. When will these cyclists learn, you vs. car means you lose! If there is a sidewalk, USE IT!!! it's not worth rolling the dice. I'm starting to not feel sorry for cyclists that are involved in these types of accidents. We have such awesome sidewalks in this area, and quite a bit away from vehicular traffic. USE THEM and save your life! DUH!

NaplesSparky writes:

in response to upagain:

Why is this the only recreational sport that is given precedence to interact with peoples daily living. Do I have to wait for a golfer to tee off while im driving? How about if skateboarders and rollerbladers want to use our roads to? We limit golf carts going on certain roads for safety. This is a recreation and should be treated like it. A road should have max 10 k traffic count per day in order for these hobbyists to travel on.

Not everyone riding a bike is doing it for sport which is why the roads belong to bicycle riders too. Not everyone can afford a car or is able to have a drivers license, yet they still have to get to work. The bus is not an option for everyone either. Your comment reeks of self-important douchbaggery and a complete misunderstanding of the fact that driving is a privilege, not a right. Get over yourself.

Judge_Judy writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Then you're not riding your bike for the same reasons that some of us do or must.

And that's fine, but that doesn't mean that every biker who does take to the streets deserves to be run over by a self-important motorist who can't afford a 4-8 second delay to pass a cyclist without murdering or maiming them.

In the words of William Money from the movie Unforgiven, "Deserves got nothing to do with it".

lf_photo writes:

in response to NOYB5:

The people who designed the roads never designed a lot of them to accommodate cars and bikes at the same time.

If you drive a car 35 mph on I-75, then you are just as much of a danger to other motorists as if you drive 90 mph. That is why highways have maximum *AND* minimum speed limits.

Bikes going 15-20 mph should not be on the same roads as vehicles traveling 40+ mph. Redesign the roadways to include designated bike lanes, instead of trying to force bikes traveling half the speed of cars to occupy the same space.

Good idea, but not enough. Bikers are getting hit in designated bike lanes and at lower speed limits as well. Need stiff judicial deterrents to wake drivers up and pay attention.

CeceliaRose writes:

I cannot put all bikers in the same category. However, in Naples Park recently, I was driving east and came to an intersection where I did not have the stop sign. A group of bikers, at least 10 I would say, were riding north. When they came to the intersection, the leader of the pack stretched his arm straight forward, evidently a signal to keep going, and they did not stop at the stop sign. Yes, I think automobile drivers should have respect for bikers, but I think that bikers should also have respect for the laws of the road.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to Judge_Judy:

When riding my bike, I do not put myself in any situation that would allow a car to crush me. I do not put myself in any situation where I am at the mercy of a car driver. I do not put myself in any situation where the driver of a car controls my destiny. I do not put myself in any situation where the car driver has my life in their hands.

JJ gets it, a huge dose of common sense would be great for America.

It's about personal responsibility.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Then you're not riding your bike for the same reasons that some of us do or must.

And that's fine, but that doesn't mean that every biker who does take to the streets deserves to be run over by a self-important motorist who can't afford a 4-8 second delay to pass a cyclist without murdering or maiming them.

So you think that you have a better "reason" for cycling? You are stating that you are more important than everyone else, no?

Are you saying that to get your heart rate up you are willing to create a traffic hazard that endangers the safety of all involved? How incredibly self centered are you?

When on our roads you have to take others into account. Well I suppose if you're some sort of ego maniac you might feel like you don't need to be unselfish.

Rather than getting your exercise by creating a dangerous situation why don't you A) ride an exercise bike or B) make a conscious decision to ride in areas that doesn't negatively affect the safety of all those around you?

Google "spin class"

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to upagain:

Why is this the only recreational sport that is given precedence to interact with peoples daily living. Do I have to wait for a golfer to tee off while im driving? How about if skateboarders and rollerbladers want to use our roads to? We limit golf carts going on certain roads for safety. This is a recreation and should be treated like it. A road should have max 10 k traffic count per day in order for these hobbyists to travel on.

This x 1000

(Sarcasm) I like to get my exercise by placing my weight bench at the side of the road. Cars only have to leave their lane to get around me as I exercise.

What's the big deal with those people risking their lives so I can exercise a bit? I have the legal right to exercise!

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

So you think that you have a better "reason" for cycling? You are stating that you are more important than everyone else, no?

Are you saying that to get your heart rate up you are willing to create a traffic hazard that endangers the safety of all involved? How incredibly self centered are you?

When on our roads you have to take others into account. Well I suppose if you're some sort of ego maniac you might feel like you don't need to be unselfish.

Rather than getting your exercise by creating a dangerous situation why don't you A) ride an exercise bike or B) make a conscious decision to ride in areas that doesn't negatively affect the safety of all those around you?

Google "spin class"

Don't turn into a troll, HC. You're better than that.

I cycle to work because it's sustainable.
I cycle to work because it's healthy.
I cycle to work because it's quiet.
I cycle to work because I'm far less likely to kill someone else than a motorist is.
I cycle to work to be one less car on the road.
I cycle to work to feel more connected with the place I live in.

These are all reasons why I'm willing to ride 28 miles per day, round trip. Most of them are beneficial to you as much as they are to me. You're welcome.

I also cycle to work because I train year round to participate in the largest athletic fundraiser in the world (http://pmc.org) where, this year, for the 5th year in a row, I will raise thousands of dollars for cancer research and treatment. It's a 2-day, 200 mile ride, and you can't just pull those kinds of miles out of a hat.

And I cycle to work because it's my right to, and because the roads are to be shared by law of the land, and absolutely nothing you say is going to change that.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Don't turn into a troll, HC. You're better than that.

I cycle to work because it's sustainable.
I cycle to work because it's healthy.
I cycle to work because it's quiet.
I cycle to work because I'm far less likely to kill someone else than a motorist is.
I cycle to work to be one less car on the road.
I cycle to work to feel more connected with the place I live in.

These are all reasons why I'm willing to ride 28 miles per day, round trip. Most of them are beneficial to you as much as they are to me. You're welcome.

I also cycle to work because I train year round to participate in the largest athletic fundraiser in the world (http://pmc.org) where, this year, for the 5th year in a row, I will raise thousands of dollars for cancer research and treatment. It's a 2-day, 200 mile ride, and you can't just pull those kinds of miles out of a hat.

And I cycle to work because it's my right to, and because the roads are to be shared by law of the land, and absolutely nothing you say is going to change that.

I've designed and will be patenting a new bike helmet with a compartment for the wearer to safely carry a living will.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to upagain:

Why is this the only recreational sport that is given precedence to interact with peoples daily living. Do I have to wait for a golfer to tee off while im driving? How about if skateboarders and rollerbladers want to use our roads to? We limit golf carts going on certain roads for safety. This is a recreation and should be treated like it. A road should have max 10 k traffic count per day in order for these hobbyists to travel on.

I have played several golf courses where the cart path actually CROSSES THE PUBLIC street a few times,and very often crossing the street within the gated communities...---and I know you would see it as "interfering with your daily living", but in the REAL WORLD, it's call mutual respect and courtesy---And since biking is a legally protected activity on the public roads, perhaps it's time for a lesson for you in common courtesy. You must love it when they have a road race, even though it could be a fund raiser for charity.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

Don't turn into a troll, HC. You're better than that.

I cycle to work because it's sustainable.
I cycle to work because it's healthy.
I cycle to work because it's quiet.
I cycle to work because I'm far less likely to kill someone else than a motorist is.
I cycle to work to be one less car on the road.
I cycle to work to feel more connected with the place I live in.

These are all reasons why I'm willing to ride 28 miles per day, round trip. Most of them are beneficial to you as much as they are to me. You're welcome.

I also cycle to work because I train year round to participate in the largest athletic fundraiser in the world (http://pmc.org) where, this year, for the 5th year in a row, I will raise thousands of dollars for cancer research and treatment. It's a 2-day, 200 mile ride, and you can't just pull those kinds of miles out of a hat.

And I cycle to work because it's my right to, and because the roads are to be shared by law of the land, and absolutely nothing you say is going to change that.

I agree with everything you say. I also ride my bike a great deal. Where we differ is I see some roads as being a logical place to ride and other roads to be an illogical place to ride.

I'm just asking people to do what is logical.

BonitaTango writes:

I cycle to work because it's sustainable.
I cycle to work because it's healthy.
I cycle to work because it's quiet.
I cycle to work because I'm far less likely to kill someone else than a motorist is.
I cycle to work to be one less car on the road.
I cycle to work to feel more connected with the place I live in.

Sounds like the Susan Rice speech on Ukraine yesterday...repeat...repeat...repeat..

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to BonitaTango:

I cycle to work because it's sustainable.
I cycle to work because it's healthy.
I cycle to work because it's quiet.
I cycle to work because I'm far less likely to kill someone else than a motorist is.
I cycle to work to be one less car on the road.
I cycle to work to feel more connected with the place I live in.

Sounds like the Susan Rice speech on Ukraine yesterday...repeat...repeat...repeat..

As hard as you try to sound like puckdog sometimes, I just can't dislike you. You've said too many reasonable and intelligent things and, while I don't necessarily agree with you, I will continue to be respectful.

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

I agree with everything you say. I also ride my bike a great deal. Where we differ is I see some roads as being a logical place to ride and other roads to be an illogical place to ride.

I'm just asking people to do what is logical.

But how is riding in a designated, purpose-built bicycle lane, in the correct direction with traffic, illogical?

There is a cultural problem among motorists in this state specifically. The statistics speak for themselves, and stories like this one are just drops in the bucket.

BonitaTango writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

As hard as you try to sound like puckdog sometimes, I just can't dislike you. You've said too many reasonable and intelligent things and, while I don't necessarily agree with you, I will continue to be respectful.

You'll regret all that pedaling when you're 102 and your knee joint cartilage is worn through.

HenryChinaski writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

But how is riding in a designated, purpose-built bicycle lane, in the correct direction with traffic, illogical?

There is a cultural problem among motorists in this state specifically. The statistics speak for themselves, and stories like this one are just drops in the bucket.

Riding in a bike lane that is only separated from traffic by a white painted line is adequate if there are no other options. If there is another paved path that runs parallel to the road separated from traffic by a concrete curb and possibly a strip of grass further removing you from traffic that is a better option.

Choosing where you ride should primarily be about your personal safety. Far down the list at number two is exercise. Exercise from biking can be achieved without ever leaving home.

If you feel comfortable assuming the drivers on the road won't run into you then you won't think about this issue in the same manner I do. I refuse to assume I'm bullet proof.

For the record I would prefer all of America be built around travel by bike and public transportation with cars being seldom used.
That is a completely separate issue though the issue in Naples are the drivers who are stoned out of their minds on booze and pills mixed with our poorly planned traffic patterns and even more poorly planned biking paths.

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to BonitaTango:

You'll regret all that pedaling when you're 102 and your knee joint cartilage is worn through.

It's mostly _because_ of the pedaling that I'll have a shot at 102. I plan on getting knee replacements before 70 ;)

PMC_Rider writes:

in response to HenryChinaski:

Riding in a bike lane that is only separated from traffic by a white painted line is adequate if there are no other options. If there is another paved path that runs parallel to the road separated from traffic by a concrete curb and possibly a strip of grass further removing you from traffic that is a better option.

Choosing where you ride should primarily be about your personal safety. Far down the list at number two is exercise. Exercise from biking can be achieved without ever leaving home.

If you feel comfortable assuming the drivers on the road won't run into you then you won't think about this issue in the same manner I do. I refuse to assume I'm bullet proof.

For the record I would prefer all of America be built around travel by bike and public transportation with cars being seldom used.
That is a completely separate issue though the issue in Naples are the drivers who are stoned out of their minds on booze and pills mixed with our poorly planned traffic patterns and even more poorly planned biking paths.

I _don't_ always feel comfortable riding on Livingston or Vanderbilt or Davis, but I have little choice. I live off Radio, and I work in Mercato. We have one car, but my wife uses it every day.

There are definitely cyclists out there who take unnecessary risks (I see them too), but it is *illogical* to classify every victim of a crash like this one as such. A lot of cyclists are just trying to responsibly get from A to B.

Again, it is a _culture_ problem that is mostly unique to Florida. I've cycled the streets of Boston for years and never experienced the intimidation, harassment and complete lack of respect I have in just 18 months here.

Better infrastructure to provide safer commuting options for everyone? Absolutely! Bring it on! But it's going to be years before those things measurably improve.

Motorists here embrace recklessness, and it needs to change. The best way to do that is to start punishing people who are careless with the lives of those they come in contact with.

I will be at the Share the Road safety expo this Saturday at Cambier Park. Will you?

lf_photo writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

But how is riding in a designated, purpose-built bicycle lane, in the correct direction with traffic, illogical?

There is a cultural problem among motorists in this state specifically. The statistics speak for themselves, and stories like this one are just drops in the bucket.

Fully agree with your comment. That bikers are facing hostile attitudes is made abundantly clear by this column, and prior columns reporting accidents, where some comments were even gleeful. The bottom line - no matter how bad the biker is riding, no matter how in a hurry or aggravated you are, a driver can't hit a person on a bicycle. I think the only cure to these irrational attitudes is deterrence with severe punishment - these drivers need to face jail-time. To me it is akin to manslaughter. I would even go further and say there should be a presumption of guilt. It's not like a 5 to 6 foot person on a two wheels is hard to see.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

I _don't_ always feel comfortable riding on Livingston or Vanderbilt or Davis, but I have little choice. I live off Radio, and I work in Mercato. We have one car, but my wife uses it every day.

There are definitely cyclists out there who take unnecessary risks (I see them too), but it is *illogical* to classify every victim of a crash like this one as such. A lot of cyclists are just trying to responsibly get from A to B.

Again, it is a _culture_ problem that is mostly unique to Florida. I've cycled the streets of Boston for years and never experienced the intimidation, harassment and complete lack of respect I have in just 18 months here.

Better infrastructure to provide safer commuting options for everyone? Absolutely! Bring it on! But it's going to be years before those things measurably improve.

Motorists here embrace recklessness, and it needs to change. The best way to do that is to start punishing people who are careless with the lives of those they come in contact with.

I will be at the Share the Road safety expo this Saturday at Cambier Park. Will you?

The stereotype of Boston/New Englanders is cold, unfriendly----Southerners warm, friendly, hospitable---but Florida?--mean, uncaring, selfish---and if you get those receptions already when biking ---don't do any of these activities while biking"

--playing any music too loud
--texting
--buying skittles

It's all the same culture

PMC_Rider writes:

What's actually interesting is that it's the automobile and the anonymous internet that transform Floridians into their worst form. Anyone you meet in person down here is generally polite and considerate. It's the disassociation that occurs behind the wheel and online that draws out the worst in us. Forgetting that the "god d-mn cyclist" who might cost you 4-8 seconds to safely pass is a _fellow Floridian_ and a human being with a family is, apparently, all too easy.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

What's actually interesting is that it's the automobile and the anonymous internet that transform Floridians into their worst form. Anyone you meet in person down here is generally polite and considerate. It's the disassociation that occurs behind the wheel and online that draws out the worst in us. Forgetting that the "god d-mn cyclist" who might cost you 4-8 seconds to safely pass is a _fellow Floridian_ and a human being with a family is, apparently, all too easy.

So many here really don't care about the loss of life---we can recognize them as, to coin a new phrase, the "Michael Dunn Crowd"---and they don't care about the loss of a life while biking, texting, playing loud music, or shopping for Skittles.

BUT when it comes to 4 American lives lost in Libya who were killed by terrorists??? OMG, we'll be hearing about that for at least the next 2 1/2 years---is the concern humanitarian, or merely political??? And many of them label others as hypocrites.

Then reference 2001 9/11 USA--And we all CHEER when Bush says into hi megaphone that "those who DID this will hear from ALL of us soon" Yes---we never heard the words "Liberal" or "Tea Party", or trolls, or lemmings, or sheeple, etc.

The word "Transparency" has become quite popular word these days, with a new meaning and intent. We can see through them,.

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