'What are you doing for others?' Many finding ways to honor MLK Jr. by serving and helping out

In this 1963 photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. prepares to address an estimated audience of 200,000 from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Holding onto Dr. King's arm is UAW president Walter Reuther. (SHNS photo courtesy of Walter P. Reuther Library)

In this 1963 photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. prepares to address an estimated audience of 200,000 from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Holding onto Dr. King's arm is UAW president Walter Reuther. (SHNS photo courtesy of Walter P. Reuther Library)

In this April 3, 1968, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. makes his last public appearance at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn. The following day King was assassinated on his motel balcony. King's actual birthday is Jan. 15. The Georgia native, who was born in Atlanta, would have been 83 years old. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly, File)

Photo by Charles Kelly

In this April 3, 1968, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. makes his last public appearance at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn. The following day King was assassinated on his motel balcony. King's actual birthday is Jan. 15. The Georgia native, who was born in Atlanta, would have been 83 years old. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly, File)

In this 2012 file photo, the drum corps of the Mahanaim Seventh-day Adventist Church perform along Fifth Avenue South in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Parade on Monday, Jan. 16, 2012, in Naples.

Photo by DAVID ALBERS, Naples Daily News // Buy this photo

In this 2012 file photo, the drum corps of the Mahanaim Seventh-day Adventist Church perform along Fifth Avenue South in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Parade on Monday, Jan. 16, 2012, in Naples.

Corey Perrine/Staff 
 Xavian Michel, 5, is cradled in the arms of his mother, Ana Whittaker, after receiving an American flag face painting at Cambier Park Monday, Jan 21, 2012, in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Photo by COREY PERRINE, Naples Daily News // Buy this photo

Corey Perrine/Staff Xavian Michel, 5, is cradled in the arms of his mother, Ana Whittaker, after receiving an American flag face painting at Cambier Park Monday, Jan 21, 2012, in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Corey Perrine/Staff 
 A portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen on display at Cambier Park as patrons listen to performances last year in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Photo by COREY PERRINE, Naples Daily News // Buy this photo

Corey Perrine/Staff A portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen on display at Cambier Park as patrons listen to performances last year in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Corey Perrine/Staff 
 From left, Kendall Pratt, 15, Meodney Xavier, 18, Tashana Minnis, 16, and Katurah Lansiquot, 16, photograph themselves at Cambier Park Monday, Jan 21, 2012, in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Photo by COREY PERRINE, Naples Daily News // Buy this photo

Corey Perrine/Staff From left, Kendall Pratt, 15, Meodney Xavier, 18, Tashana Minnis, 16, and Katurah Lansiquot, 16, photograph themselves at Cambier Park Monday, Jan 21, 2012, in Naples. Patrons celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with food, entertainment, music and more in the park concluding an hour-long parade.

Many residents and organizations in Southwest Florida are joining the cause to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the upcoming federal holiday that celebrates his birthday by contributing to their communities in organized and creative ways, with some taking the day on instead of the day off.

“We are answering Martin Luther King’s quote: ‘Life’s most urgent question is: What are you doing for others?’” said Michelle Whitmore.

Whitmore and Camara McClellan, both of Naples, are offering their yoga skills by hosting a class on the beach as a fundraiser for PACE Center for Girls, from 9 to 10 a.m., Fri., Jan. 24, at Vanderbilt Beach, 280 Vanderbilt Beach Rd., Naples. There is no minimum donation amount to participate.

Whitmore, McClellan and about nine other yoga teacher trainees from Love Yoga Center decided to focus on helping PACE Center for Girls, located in Immokalee, because they felt aligned with the organization’s mission to help at-risk girls, providing them with a safe environment and opportunity for a better future through education, counseling, training and advocacy, said Whitmore.

The group of yoga teachers are also taking turns offering yoga to PACE students at the center in Immokalee.

“Our answer to King’s question of ‘What are you doing for others?’ is: We are serving them,” said Whitmore.

Whether contributing money or time, Whitmore encouraged others take some action to “shake up that feeling of separateness.”

“People can serve their community just by being aware of small opportunities to uplift and change a person’s day,” said McClellan.

If you would like to contribute to PACE Center for Girls, but yoga isn’t your thing, visit pacecenter.org or call (239) 657-2400 to learn more about how you can serve.

There are several other organized events to participate in and everyone is encouraged to find a way to answer the national call for service by giving of their time, talents or resources in creative ways on the actual federal holiday or any other day in honor of the slain Civil Rights leader.

Collier County School District officials are encouraging participation and many are leading the way in the 17th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade, at 11 a.m. Jan. 20. Collier County Superintendent Kamela Patton is co-grand marshal, along with Wells Fargo Bank. Collier County School Board members Julie Sprague and Roy Terry will also march in King’s honor, along with bands from several area JROTC’s, including Lely High, Immokalee High, Golden Gate High, Barron Collier High, Naples High School and Palmetto Ridge High.

The 2014 MLK Parade and Celebration begins at the corner of Broad Avenue South and Third Street South in downtown Naples and concludes with a celebration kicking off at noon in Cambier Park. Sponsorship and other information is available on the website of the Collier County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), naacpcolliercounty.com, or by calling (239) 249-9738.

Other service ideas can be found by contacting area churches, schools and nonprofits or visiting MLKDay.gov. The website includes all the information about the annual MLK Day of Service, which is a part of United We Serve, the president’s national call to service for Americans of all walks of life to work together to provide solutions to the nation’s and your community’s most pressing problems.

The website offers listings of projects, organizations and events, such as the 8th Annual Run for the Paws, a 5k run or walk to benefit the Humane Society of Naples, set for Saturday, Jan. 25. The race begins at 8 a.m. at Naples Municipal Airport.

Runners, walkers and their sponsors aren’t the only people offering their service to at-risk animals. About 14 college students are coming to Naples from the University of Florida the weekend of MLK Day to volunteer at Shy Wolf Sanctuary. The students will be helping to update animal enclosures, clear vegetation and do other hands-on labor projects for the nonprofit in Golden Gate Estates that is home for many rescued animals, including prairie dogs, coyotes, bobcats, panthers, gopher tortoises, wolves and wolf-dogs.

“Our mission is to educate people and reconnect them with animals. We care for animals that can’t be released into the wild and were in situations where they were abused, neglected or economic changes didn’t allow for continued proper care of the animals,” said Shane Blitz, of Shy Wolf Sanctuary.

Shy Wolf Sanctuary, located at 1161 27th Street SW, off Pine Ridge Road where it turns to White Boulevard just east of Collier Boulevard, is open on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Visit shywolfsanctuary.com and fill out a form in advance if interested in volunteering.

Lee County is also in need of volunteers to repair harm caused by youth against victims and neighborhoods beginning Jan. 18, the Saturday before Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and in the future, to serve on a Neighborhood Accountability Board.

“Instead of focusing on who broke the law, what laws were broken and how we will punish the youth, this process takes a restorative justice perspective, focusing the attention on what harm was done and what needs to be done to repair the harm,” said Nora Donato-Hitchcock of Lee County Human Services.

Youth can be eligible to participate.

“There’s a huge need for people living within the city of Fort Myers and Bonita Springs. We do serve the Bonita Springs area and we have a good amount of kids that come from that area,” said Donato-Hitchcock.

Collier County residents who live close to Bonita Springs may also choose to get involved, she said.

Training is scheduled 9:30 a.m. Sat., Jan. 18, at the Lee County Department of Human Services, 2440 Thompson St., Fort Myers. Other trainings will also be scheduled. Contact Lee County Human Services, (239) 533-7947 or ndonato@leegov.com for more information.

© 2014 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 22

big-peach-e writes:

To honor MLK, Republican Governors and Legislatures in Florida and other states are scheming up new ways to block the Black vote.

MasonDixon writes:

in response to big-peach-e:

To honor MLK, Republican Governors and Legislatures in Florida and other states are scheming up new ways to block the Black vote.

/\ You all know the race baiters would come out of the shadows for this. /\

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to big-peach-e:

To honor MLK, Republican Governors and Legislatures in Florida and other states are scheming up new ways to block the Black vote.

You're just upset that the Republicans have come up with ways to better implement the despicable tactics invented and openly practiced for decades by Democrats.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to MasonDixon:

/\ You all know the race baiters would come out of the shadows for this. /\

But in truth, is big-peach right or wrong??

For example...

"By most standards, Desmond Meade is an overachiever. The 46-year-old is a fourth-year law student at Florida International University. He made the 2013 dean’s list.

But, barring some unforeseen policy change, he won’t ever get the chance to practice law in his state. And this promising, African-American law student isn't allowed to vote.

Nearly two decades ago, after a struggle with drugs and alcohol led to a series of run-ins with the law, Meade served three years in prison....

......but because of a policy adopted by Florida Gov. Rick Scott in 2011, he is prohibited not only from voting, but also from serving on a jury and becoming a member of the Florida bar.

“I was in prison because I had an addiction to drugs and alcohol," he said. "Should I be ostracized for the rest of my life? Yes, I should pay the price. But once I serve my time, I'm still an American."

Of course, if he was white and a Tea Party supporter, he would be sent to represent Florida voters in Congress.

"More than a million of these disenfranchised Americans are black. Felony convictions restrict 13 percent of the country's black male population from voting, prompting critics to portray felon disenfranchisement as an heir to the voter-suppression tactics of the Jim Crow era.

"Back then, black people eager to cast their ballots encountered poll taxes, literacy tests and violence. Today, the mechanisms of disenfranchisement may be more sophisticated, but they can be just as oppressive, civil rights leaders say."

And, as we know,...

"More than 30 states have passed laws in recent years requiring voters to display photo identification, which minorities and low-income Americans disproportionately lack. "

So there are multiple issues, whether we like it or not, that Dr. King would be involved in if he were here today.

And the opponents will always just respond by calling it "race baiting", while lacking a solid argument to refute the original claim.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to WeThePeople2016:

But in truth, is big-peach right or wrong??

For example...

"By most standards, Desmond Meade is an overachiever. The 46-year-old is a fourth-year law student at Florida International University. He made the 2013 dean’s list.

But, barring some unforeseen policy change, he won’t ever get the chance to practice law in his state. And this promising, African-American law student isn't allowed to vote.

Nearly two decades ago, after a struggle with drugs and alcohol led to a series of run-ins with the law, Meade served three years in prison....

......but because of a policy adopted by Florida Gov. Rick Scott in 2011, he is prohibited not only from voting, but also from serving on a jury and becoming a member of the Florida bar.

“I was in prison because I had an addiction to drugs and alcohol," he said. "Should I be ostracized for the rest of my life? Yes, I should pay the price. But once I serve my time, I'm still an American."

Of course, if he was white and a Tea Party supporter, he would be sent to represent Florida voters in Congress.

"More than a million of these disenfranchised Americans are black. Felony convictions restrict 13 percent of the country's black male population from voting, prompting critics to portray felon disenfranchisement as an heir to the voter-suppression tactics of the Jim Crow era.

"Back then, black people eager to cast their ballots encountered poll taxes, literacy tests and violence. Today, the mechanisms of disenfranchisement may be more sophisticated, but they can be just as oppressive, civil rights leaders say."

And, as we know,...

"More than 30 states have passed laws in recent years requiring voters to display photo identification, which minorities and low-income Americans disproportionately lack. "

So there are multiple issues, whether we like it or not, that Dr. King would be involved in if he were here today.

And the opponents will always just respond by calling it "race baiting", while lacking a solid argument to refute the original claim.

(cont)....

The big picture is "Today's right-wing leaders are 'trying to do everything they can to slow down a future they can't stop,' he says. 'They know that the demographics have shifted."

And all of this looks to factual observations and a true commentary about an aspect of politics in America today---

And that 5-4 Supreme Court decision about the Voting Rights Act will facilitate the process.

Of course, this is not new--the Civil Right Commission examining the 2000 election found that...

..."The U.S. Civil Rights Commission investigation into the 2000 presidential election in Florida concluded that black voters were disproportionately purged from the voter rolls. In Miami-Dade, 65 percent of those purged were black even though they accounted for only 20 percent of the population."

That, and the inability to even count votes we all know resulted in Bush stealing Florida, and the election from Gore in 2000.

--------------------------------------------

I was actually surprised how much information is out there about this. I was surprised that nothing came up refuting any of this.

Happy MLK Day and enjoy your day off it it applies.

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to WeThePeople2016:

But in truth, is big-peach right or wrong??

For example...

"By most standards, Desmond Meade is an overachiever. The 46-year-old is a fourth-year law student at Florida International University. He made the 2013 dean’s list.

But, barring some unforeseen policy change, he won’t ever get the chance to practice law in his state. And this promising, African-American law student isn't allowed to vote.

Nearly two decades ago, after a struggle with drugs and alcohol led to a series of run-ins with the law, Meade served three years in prison....

......but because of a policy adopted by Florida Gov. Rick Scott in 2011, he is prohibited not only from voting, but also from serving on a jury and becoming a member of the Florida bar.

“I was in prison because I had an addiction to drugs and alcohol," he said. "Should I be ostracized for the rest of my life? Yes, I should pay the price. But once I serve my time, I'm still an American."

Of course, if he was white and a Tea Party supporter, he would be sent to represent Florida voters in Congress.

"More than a million of these disenfranchised Americans are black. Felony convictions restrict 13 percent of the country's black male population from voting, prompting critics to portray felon disenfranchisement as an heir to the voter-suppression tactics of the Jim Crow era.

"Back then, black people eager to cast their ballots encountered poll taxes, literacy tests and violence. Today, the mechanisms of disenfranchisement may be more sophisticated, but they can be just as oppressive, civil rights leaders say."

And, as we know,...

"More than 30 states have passed laws in recent years requiring voters to display photo identification, which minorities and low-income Americans disproportionately lack. "

So there are multiple issues, whether we like it or not, that Dr. King would be involved in if he were here today.

And the opponents will always just respond by calling it "race baiting", while lacking a solid argument to refute the original claim.

'Big-Peach' is wrong in the sense that the argument being made is largely partisan and rhetorical.

For that matter, what you posted in an attempt to support 'Big-Peach' is wrong for much the same reason.

What you are trying to do in making Mr. Meade's story appear to be race-related at the hands of Republicans is misleading, likely intentionally so.

Most states require an applicant to the state bar to "demonstrate good moral character", in addition to their educational and bar exam requirements. In most states, that requirement includes being able to pass a criminal background check.

What you are describing is the rule in most states, not the exception to the rule in Florida. And, it has nothing to do with Mr. Meade's ethnic background, and everything to do with his criminal background.

As far as his rights to vote or to serve on a jury, he can file a petition with the state to have those civil rights restored, the procedure for which is outlined in state law and is a separate issue from his being admitted to the bar.

As for the rest of your post, what you are attempting to argue is not as cut-and-dried in one direction as you are trying to portray it.

Claims of "voter disenfranchisement" and "minority disenfranchisement" are as carelessly and haphazardly throw around by people who believe as you do as claims of "voter fraud" are carelessly and haphazardly throw around by others.

The truth...and, ultimately, the solutions that will best serve this country and its citizens...lies somewhere in between those extremes.

big-peach-e writes:

When will the Republicans learn? Efforts to stifle minority voting in 2012 had the reverse effect and contributed to Romney's defeat. African Americans stood in line well into the evening to cast ballots in cities across the US, including Naples, Florida. A generation of voters will remember which party shortened early voting hours,eliminated Sunday voting, and tried to implement burdensome picture ID laws to thwart and stifle their vote.

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to big-peach-e:

When will the Republicans learn? Efforts to stifle minority voting in 2012 had the reverse effect and contributed to Romney's defeat. African Americans stood in line well into the evening to cast ballots in cities across the US, including Naples, Florida. A generation of voters will remember which party shortened early voting hours,eliminated Sunday voting, and tried to implement burdensome picture ID laws to thwart and stifle their vote.

When will Democrats and liberals whining about how voter picture I.D. laws allegedly discriminate against certain voters acknowledge the fact that such laws are overwhelmingly approved by a majority of voters?

Here are a list of things that also require a photo I.D. to do...:

Purchase alcohol.
Purchase tobacco.
Open a bank account.
Apply for food stamps.
Apply for welfare.
Apply for Medicare and/or Medicaid.
Apply for Social Security.
Apply for a job.
Apply for unemployment benefits.
Apply for a home mortgage.
Apply for a home/apartment rental lease.
Rent a car.
Drive a car.
Board an airplane.
Board a cruise ship.
Get married.
Apply to purchase a firearm.
Rent a hotel room.
Apply for a hunting license.
Apply for a fishing license.
Purchase certain over-the-counter medications.
Purchase an "M-Rated" video game.

How many of the people that you are claiming are allegedly being disenfranchised by having to show a photo I.D. to vote would show a photo I.D. to do any of the things on this list without thinking twice about it or questioning it?

big-peach-e writes:

Gee I wonder if the appeals courts that throw out version after version of the photo ID laws from state after state read the same right wing sites you do? Guess not.

attaboy writes:

To Qoute: What are you doing for others?
Well, I got up and went to work today...just so I can earn a living AND contribute to 'Section 8 housing', Obama phones, Food stamps, In-State tuition for illegals and the Train wreck in Washington that keeps on giving, ObamaCare.
Now share all your liberal acollades, labeling, name calling and anything els that your soapbox can support. After all Liberals are right and always happy...until they run out of someone else's money...

dab writes:

in response to big-peach-e:

To honor MLK, Republican Governors and Legislatures in Florida and other states are scheming up new ways to block the Black vote.

I volunteer at a LOT of places on a regular basis...Church, St Matts, etc. I also go to Blood Drives, Cancer Walks and other Charity Events regularly. Let me put it this way.......seems like just about every ethnic group EXCEPT blacks honor MLK. Never see 'em

dab writes:

in response to attaboy:

To Qoute: What are you doing for others?
Well, I got up and went to work today...just so I can earn a living AND contribute to 'Section 8 housing', Obama phones, Food stamps, In-State tuition for illegals and the Train wreck in Washington that keeps on giving, ObamaCare.
Now share all your liberal acollades, labeling, name calling and anything els that your soapbox can support. After all Liberals are right and always happy...until they run out of someone else's money...

Perfect. Spot on

MasonDixon writes:

in response to AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016:

When will Democrats and liberals whining about how voter picture I.D. laws allegedly discriminate against certain voters acknowledge the fact that such laws are overwhelmingly approved by a majority of voters?

Here are a list of things that also require a photo I.D. to do...:

Purchase alcohol.
Purchase tobacco.
Open a bank account.
Apply for food stamps.
Apply for welfare.
Apply for Medicare and/or Medicaid.
Apply for Social Security.
Apply for a job.
Apply for unemployment benefits.
Apply for a home mortgage.
Apply for a home/apartment rental lease.
Rent a car.
Drive a car.
Board an airplane.
Board a cruise ship.
Get married.
Apply to purchase a firearm.
Rent a hotel room.
Apply for a hunting license.
Apply for a fishing license.
Purchase certain over-the-counter medications.
Purchase an "M-Rated" video game.

How many of the people that you are claiming are allegedly being disenfranchised by having to show a photo I.D. to vote would show a photo I.D. to do any of the things on this list without thinking twice about it or questioning it?

Exactly.
If these whiners spent the time that they do pizzing and moaning about suppression and instead helped those in need to get an ID to be able to minimally function in today's world, the alleged problem would be solved.

anicou writes:

in response to attaboy:

To Qoute: What are you doing for others?
Well, I got up and went to work today...just so I can earn a living AND contribute to 'Section 8 housing', Obama phones, Food stamps, In-State tuition for illegals and the Train wreck in Washington that keeps on giving, ObamaCare.
Now share all your liberal acollades, labeling, name calling and anything els that your soapbox can support. After all Liberals are right and always happy...until they run out of someone else's money...

Great post!

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016:

'Big-Peach' is wrong in the sense that the argument being made is largely partisan and rhetorical.

For that matter, what you posted in an attempt to support 'Big-Peach' is wrong for much the same reason.

What you are trying to do in making Mr. Meade's story appear to be race-related at the hands of Republicans is misleading, likely intentionally so.

Most states require an applicant to the state bar to "demonstrate good moral character", in addition to their educational and bar exam requirements. In most states, that requirement includes being able to pass a criminal background check.

What you are describing is the rule in most states, not the exception to the rule in Florida. And, it has nothing to do with Mr. Meade's ethnic background, and everything to do with his criminal background.

As far as his rights to vote or to serve on a jury, he can file a petition with the state to have those civil rights restored, the procedure for which is outlined in state law and is a separate issue from his being admitted to the bar.

As for the rest of your post, what you are attempting to argue is not as cut-and-dried in one direction as you are trying to portray it.

Claims of "voter disenfranchisement" and "minority disenfranchisement" are as carelessly and haphazardly throw around by people who believe as you do as claims of "voter fraud" are carelessly and haphazardly throw around by others.

The truth...and, ultimately, the solutions that will best serve this country and its citizens...lies somewhere in between those extremes.

Are you serious?? I find that Florida is one of on 12 states that ban felons from voting PERMANENTLY--even after release from prison--I am very surprised to learn that ANY do this--

So Florida in company with states like Alabama, Mississippi, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee.

By this source , your statements are way off, and of course, tries to reject the premise that black voters are denied the vote in large numbers right here in Florida by this restriction.

Think this is fair?? I know it applies to white felons too in theory, but we know the numbers. And of course we could then go into job discrimination, and a lot of other topics to examine WHY it is blacks that outnumber whites as felons.

As someone mentioned, these are just steps to try and change the inevitable impacts of demography.

source
http://felonvoting.procon.org/view.re...

WeThePeople2016 writes:

Interesting topic--and my further study finds that Florida...

"Florida – Voting rights are restored by the Florida Board of Executive Clemency. Less serious crimes do not require a hearing with the clemency board. In those cases, disfranchisement ends after it has been five years after completion of terms of incarceration, completion of parole and completion of probation. An application must be submitted to the court.

For those with serious crimes, after seven years, the Florida Executive Clemency Board will decide whether or not to restore voting rights after receiving an application from the ex-offender."

So they even make convicted felons of "lesser rimes" wait 5 years AFTER completion of all prison time AND probation---.

Still surprising in a democracy.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016:

'Big-Peach' is wrong in the sense that the argument being made is largely partisan and rhetorical.

For that matter, what you posted in an attempt to support 'Big-Peach' is wrong for much the same reason.

What you are trying to do in making Mr. Meade's story appear to be race-related at the hands of Republicans is misleading, likely intentionally so.

Most states require an applicant to the state bar to "demonstrate good moral character", in addition to their educational and bar exam requirements. In most states, that requirement includes being able to pass a criminal background check.

What you are describing is the rule in most states, not the exception to the rule in Florida. And, it has nothing to do with Mr. Meade's ethnic background, and everything to do with his criminal background.

As far as his rights to vote or to serve on a jury, he can file a petition with the state to have those civil rights restored, the procedure for which is outlined in state law and is a separate issue from his being admitted to the bar.

As for the rest of your post, what you are attempting to argue is not as cut-and-dried in one direction as you are trying to portray it.

Claims of "voter disenfranchisement" and "minority disenfranchisement" are as carelessly and haphazardly throw around by people who believe as you do as claims of "voter fraud" are carelessly and haphazardly throw around by others.

The truth...and, ultimately, the solutions that will best serve this country and its citizens...lies somewhere in between those extremes.

And I have to add the ACLU version--which lists Florida as ONE of only THREE states that do PERMANENTLY deny convicted felons the right to vote.

EVERY source I found directly contradicts your claim that it "is the RULE in most states".

On what basis do you make that claim??

And is it just possible that thi s the law to directly help one political party over another??

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to WeThePeople2016:

And I have to add the ACLU version--which lists Florida as ONE of only THREE states that do PERMANENTLY deny convicted felons the right to vote.

EVERY source I found directly contradicts your claim that it "is the RULE in most states".

On what basis do you make that claim??

And is it just possible that thi s the law to directly help one political party over another??

What I was referring to as "the rule in most states" is being able to pass a criminal background check in order to be allowed to practice law, directly refuting your claim as to why he is unable to practice law.

I was aware that restoration of civil rights, such as voting and serving jury duty, varies by states. And, I knew that Florida was one of the tougher states in which to have them restored. By it's not impossible.

The fact that you were able to find the procedure in Florida law that allows someone to petition to have their civil rights restored calls into question the ACLU information that you referenced claiming that Florida permanently denies those rights to convicted felons.

The claims that you are making and trying to justify with your arguments are specious and exaggerated, at best. People who believe as you do will generally find the conspiracies that they are looking for, whether they actually exist or not.

You are, of course, free to believe whatever you choose you to believe. That, however, does not make what you believe the truth.

I stand by my original statement.

WeThePeople2016 writes:

in response to AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016:

What I was referring to as "the rule in most states" is being able to pass a criminal background check in order to be allowed to practice law, directly refuting your claim as to why he is unable to practice law.

I was aware that restoration of civil rights, such as voting and serving jury duty, varies by states. And, I knew that Florida was one of the tougher states in which to have them restored. By it's not impossible.

The fact that you were able to find the procedure in Florida law that allows someone to petition to have their civil rights restored calls into question the ACLU information that you referenced claiming that Florida permanently denies those rights to convicted felons.

The claims that you are making and trying to justify with your arguments are specious and exaggerated, at best. People who believe as you do will generally find the conspiracies that they are looking for, whether they actually exist or not.

You are, of course, free to believe whatever you choose you to believe. That, however, does not make what you believe the truth.

I stand by my original statement.

I choose to believe what the FACTS tell me to believe, and the facts here prove that:

1--Florida is one of only 3 states that permanently , or at the minimum make it VERY difficult, for those ever convicted of a felony to ever again be able to exercise the franchise and vote on election day.
2--That this process does, in fact, disproportionately impacts black voters--for a variety of reasons.
3--the motive for many those holding to and supporting this system are racist and/or political in nature.--In any event, it certainly does aid the Republicans in elections based on any study of voting blocs
4--Back to the original article and comments posted, it IS very likely that MLK Jr. would be heard from on this issue, especially in Florida---especially considering what the Supreme Court did in regards to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in that 5-4 vote.

I stand by my conclusions based on research the topic, not on predisposition, as it seems that you do on all topics.

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to WeThePeople2016:

I choose to believe what the FACTS tell me to believe, and the facts here prove that:

1--Florida is one of only 3 states that permanently , or at the minimum make it VERY difficult, for those ever convicted of a felony to ever again be able to exercise the franchise and vote on election day.
2--That this process does, in fact, disproportionately impacts black voters--for a variety of reasons.
3--the motive for many those holding to and supporting this system are racist and/or political in nature.--In any event, it certainly does aid the Republicans in elections based on any study of voting blocs
4--Back to the original article and comments posted, it IS very likely that MLK Jr. would be heard from on this issue, especially in Florida---especially considering what the Supreme Court did in regards to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in that 5-4 vote.

I stand by my conclusions based on research the topic, not on predisposition, as it seems that you do on all topics.

1. Agree, this statement is a fact.

2. Agree, this statement is a fact, but needs to be qualified. It is not solely the fault of Republicans or conservatives, as some may choose to argue. It is the collective fault of elected officials from both sides of the aisle who prefer legislated mandatory sentencing for crimes instead of giving discretion to judges.

3. Disagree, this statement is not a fact. This statement is your opinion, and is based more on rhetoric than on complete information. History holds that both parties have benefitted from policies such as those to which you are referring, Democrats in the past and Republicans more recently. This is hardly as one-sided as you are claiming that it is.

4. Agree, this statement is a fact.

Many of your conclusions are based upon your predisposition to blame Republicans for things that aren't necessarily or solely their fault. This is your default position on most topics.

I stand by my statements based upon a pragmatic understanding of the larger picture, not on predisposition based upon one's personal political beliefs, as you are prone to do.

PMC_Rider writes:

I will engage you on this because you are actually debating like a reasoned and educated person, ATRB (welcome back).

Your disagreement on point 3 hinges upon "But Democrats were racist 45 years ago, too." I submit that what's important and relevant is the here and now.

AmericasTrueRecoveryBeginsIn2016 writes:

in response to PMC_Rider:

I will engage you on this because you are actually debating like a reasoned and educated person, ATRB (welcome back).

Your disagreement on point 3 hinges upon "But Democrats were racist 45 years ago, too." I submit that what's important and relevant is the here and now.

I don't disagree that the "here and now" is relevant. In fact, I don't even disagree that in some instances there may have been some intent to make it difficult for some people to vote.

My primary disagreement is with the implications being made by many arguing against so-called voter suppression laws allegedly enacted solely by Republicans A) that Republicans are the only ones who have ever done it or tried to do it, and B) that Republicans are the only ones who have ever benefitted or are benefitting from such tactics.

Such implications simply aren't true, as history easily and clearly bears out. And, I would argue that that is the point at which the past becomes a relevant part of the discussion.

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